Pindaya

Pindaya is situated at 1164-m above sea level and is 40-km from Kalaw. It is noted for its extensive limestone caves and Shwe U Min Paya which is full of Buddha images of about 8000 a and picturesque Boutaloke Lake. Pindaya itself is a centre for the Myanmar speaking Taung-yo people. Local handicrafts include Shan paper and parasols made from mulberry bark.
It is a small, charming town, centred round a lake, called Nattamiekan or Angels Lake. The main sight in the area is Pindaya Cave (Shwe Oo Min Cave) – the limestone caves contain a maze of chambers with 6,226 Buddha statues. Some of the images are tiny, others are huge, and are made of white marble, bronze or plaster, coated with gold leaf. Some of the smaller caves within the complex serve as meditation chambers. The main stupa dates from the 12th century.
This small town in Central Myanmar is ideal for an excursion on the way from Bagan / Mandalay to Taunggyi and Lugu Lake.
The town’s symbol is a spider. According to the legend, seven princesses bathing in the lake took refuge in the cave during a storm where they were imprisoned by a giant spider. It is a good place to begin short treks to surrounding Danu, Pa-O, Palaung and taung-yo villages.
The Pindaya caves are in limestone ridge overlooking the Pindaya lake and is full of thousands of Buddha images made from alabaster, teak, marble, brick, lacquer and cement which have been put there over centuries and arranged in such a way as to form a labyrinth throughout the various cave chambers. In these caves, you may come across lay people practicing meditation. The Pindaya caves are in limestone ridge overlooking the Pindaya lake and is full of thousands of Buddha images made from alabaster, teak, marble, brick, lacquer and cement which have been put there over centuries and arranged in such a way as to form a labyrinth throughout the various cave chambers. In these caves, you may come across lay people practicing meditation